When an Editor Asks

A Time to Mourn
When a newspaper editor asked me if I’d be interested in writing a column for the paper, and went on to say I could publish stories I’d stock-piled, even my fiction, in the form of a series, that is when I became excited and answered, yes!
The excitement grew stronger when I actually saw the title to one of my favorite stories in the local paper. And it was really great when friends told me they read the first installment and couldn’t wait to read the conclusion.
My excitement went over the top when my grandson, who is a high school senior, told me his friends read it and then he proceeded to tell me through Facebook what a talented author I am. How awesome! Readers of all ages! Talk about a pleased grandma!
I’m so thankful the editor of the Van Buren County Democrat showed an interest in my writing because I certainly am interested in writing the column for my hometown weekly newspaper—the Van Buren County Democrat!

What’s in a Title? What’s in a Name?

 Like people with names, books must have titles. Titles of stories and books are important and not always created by the author of the work.

And a newborn foal needs an appropriate name whether it grows up to run a race or to run across a meadow on a fine summer day with a boy guiding the reins.

Story titles do not necessarily represent story content. But some do. Perhaps many do in a subjective way.  “Gone with the Wind” represents the end of an era.  Margaret Mitchell’s working title for her book was ” Tomorrow is Another Day.”

I used a working title from the start of my first novel until near its completion.  A member of my critique group, Rhonda Roberts, whose advice I trust,  suggested that I change the title and she gave reasons why.  After working with my original title for such a long time, this was a difficult decision. Finally, after sifting through a number of titles based on Rhonda’s reasons  for a change, my daughter, Tracy Broadwater,  an avid reader, and I came up with the exact wording for the title. To both of these young ladies, I say “Thanks for my title:  “CALL of the CADRON.”                                  

The characters in my novel sometimes ride horses. Names of horses in the story are: King, Beaut, Sundance, Hobo, Gumbo and Duke.    

        I don’t know the name my grandsons will choose for the foal in the picture below.  But I’m certain they will decide on a very special name for such a fine little filly who arrived at their place just one day ago, on a sunny April morning.

cCopyright, 2012, photo by Freeda Baker Nichols

Crackerjack and newborn foal

Crackerjack and newborn foal