What’s in a Title? What’s in a Name?

 Like people with names, books must have titles. Titles of stories and books are important and not always created by the author of the work.

And a newborn foal needs an appropriate name whether it grows up to run a race or to run across a meadow on a fine summer day with a boy guiding the reins.

Story titles do not necessarily represent story content. But some do. Perhaps many do in a subjective way.  “Gone with the Wind” represents the end of an era.  Margaret Mitchell’s working title for her book was ” Tomorrow is Another Day.”

I used a working title from the start of my first novel until near its completion.  A member of my critique group, Rhonda Roberts, whose advice I trust,  suggested that I change the title and she gave reasons why.  After working with my original title for such a long time, this was a difficult decision. Finally, after sifting through a number of titles based on Rhonda’s reasons  for a change, my daughter, Tracy Broadwater,  an avid reader, and I came up with the exact wording for the title. To both of these young ladies, I say “Thanks for my title:  “CALL of the CADRON.”                                  

The characters in my novel sometimes ride horses. Names of horses in the story are: King, Beaut, Sundance, Hobo, Gumbo and Duke.    

        I don’t know the name my grandsons will choose for the foal in the picture below.  But I’m certain they will decide on a very special name for such a fine little filly who arrived at their place just one day ago, on a sunny April morning.

cCopyright, 2012, photo by Freeda Baker Nichols

Crackerjack and newborn foal

Crackerjack and newborn foal